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*Filtering posts tagged Curiosity

  • "Why Curiosity is my Compass"

    Earlier this year Sarah Ellis asked me to talk at the Marketing Academy's 'Inspire Live' event at Google's shiny new Kings Cross HQ.  The theme for the day was '10 Superpowers every leader needs.' Sarah asked me to talk about one of my favourite subjects - curiosity; how people can use curiosity as a superpower to unlock opportunities in their business and work lives (here are my slides)

    One member of the audience told me it had been a "shot in the arm" reminding him and his team to stay curious at work. If your team or organisation needs a shot in the arm and you'd like me to run a workshop or give a presentation on curiosity, get in touch:  hello@iansanders.com


    (thanks for the pic Matt Desmier!)

  • Introducing 'Curiosity & Opportunity'

    Some people's careers and businesses are driven by a curiosity to try out new things. Others follow the opportunities that are presented to them.  My own life in self-employment has been crafted out of a combination of the two.  My gig at the Financial Times was borne out of my curiosity; my two year assignment working with Benetton came about from spotting a commercial opportunity, which I then turned into a big project.

    I'm fascinated by the stories behind people’s work lives and that balance between curiosity and opportunity. I also love to use video to tell such stories.

    Throw those two things together and you get my latest side project - ‘Curiosity & Opportunity’, a collaboration with Michal Dzierza.

    In this series we’ll talk to a bunch of interesting people from creators to entrepreneurs and ask them what has guided them: curiosity or opportunity? In our first episode, we hear from designer/firestarter  James Victore about how he’s never followed the dollar and what curiosity means to him.

     

  • Injecting curiosity into your career and work life

    Last week I was delighted to give a presentation on curiosity to the nice folk at Dentsu Aegis, as part of their Route 500 career development programme. At the end of my talk I got asked some smart questions, so I’m sharing them - along with my responses - below:

    1. Q. How do you avoid getting digitally distracted when you’re being curious on platforms like Twitter?Checking Twitter is a great route for exploring and learning, but you might want to avoid getting lost down online ‘rabbit holes’. It can be hard to strike the right balance. What I try is to ‘check in’ with myself every few minutes. Check in and ask: is what I’m doing right now valuable? What have I learned in the last ten minutes? If you’ve caught yourself out and find yourself watching some random video after getting distracted from an article you were reading, maybe it’s time to take a break.
    2. Q. Being curious requires you to ‘think like a kid’ and ask questions without fear of failure; but how does that work in a practical sense - what if you're not comfortable being so inquisitive?Sure, we’re not all extrovert enough to go round asking questions of everyone we meet. In my own experience, it’s about switching into the right mindset, where I give myself that ‘licence to be curious’ to start talking to shopkeepers or to strangers in coffee shops. I don’t walk around with that mindset all the time, it’s a behaviour I switch on when I feel like it (check out my post ‘Do talk to a stranger’ if you want to explore this further).
    3. Q. How do you differentiate between people in life who are genuinely curious and those who use the internet to be curious, who are perhaps ‘fraudulently’ curious? I don’t believe one version of curiosity is necessarily better than the other. Both approaches are valid. Sure, nothing beats deep-dive curiosity when you are learning about something new, but sometimes it’s necessary to take digital shortcuts. I gave my own example of going to South By South West. Nothing beats going to SXSW in person, sitting watching a panel, meeting new people face to face. But it’s not always practical to spend the time and money going to a big conference like that; sometimes it’s more convenient to be curious by following a hashtag rather than being there in person. And that’s fine.
    4. Q. Any tips if you’re feeling stale and not getting very curious?When your curiosity muscle seizes up, change your surroundings. I always find journeys very productive for exploring my curiosity and coming up with new ideas. So, if I don’t have any business trips coming up and I’m feeling stale, I go somewhere. I take a journey (see my post on the value of ‘inspiration trips’ if you’re interested in finding out more).
    5.  Q. How can we make an organisation more curious? My advice is to get the people in an organisation hanging out together; getting them communicating and interacting across different disciplines outside of their comfort zone. Socially as well as in the workplace, informally as well as formally. I’ve found it’s that cross-fertilisation of ideas and experiences that nurtures curiosity.
  • Lessons in living a curious life from Ideas Tapas

    What do you think of when you hear the word ‘curiosity’? I think of my seven year old son at breakfast last week, with his book of facts, wide-eyed, full of wonder about his latest discovery. Many of us lose that childlike sense of exploration and discovery when we start our careers. I’ve focused on carving out a working life driven by being curious, and in doing so have discarded a traditional career ladder in favour of a bunch of interesting stories.

    Curiosity was on the menu in Geneva last week as DJ Forza and I hosted a discussion ‘How to live a curious life’ at Ideas Tapas (here’s my post on what Ideas Tapas is all about). It was great hearing twelve different perspectives around the table from a mix of voices, disciplines and mindsets.

    So I’m on a mission to reposition ‘curiosity’. Some may think it’s only valuable at the edges of our life for learning and discovery. I disagree - it can actually be harnessed as a business tool, a powerful mindset to bring to work and business, where you open the possibilities by asking ‘what if?’. After all, where would start-up ideas be without curiosity?

    At Ideas Tapas we heard some great stories. How one person’s curiosity led him to randomly discover a website where he spotted an ad for the job he’s now doing; a role he would have never set out to seek. Another guest told the group not to cease to be curious - to follow your dream, even when you think you’re too old. His advice was not to shut down potential opportunities because they’re outside your core area, revealing after a life-long career in aviation, he’d reinvented himself as a headhunter. We heard an incredible story from the streets of Freetown, Sierra Leone - how curiosity had led to an entrepreneurial adventure with a truly innovative street-marketing campaign.

    At the end of the evening in Geneva’s Manifesto bar, my collaborator DJ and I passed around a bowl of temporary tattoos made by Tattly for our guests to sample. I told the story of how Tina Roth Eisenberg - aka SwissMiss - started Tattly purely out of curiosity after her daughter came home from a party with a poorly designed tattoo. Tina wondered whether she could improve on it; today it’s a successful business employing a team of people, an idea that started with a ‘what if?’ rather than a business plan.

    Our guests left the tapas table with inspiration to inject more curiosity into their daily lives. Before she left, one guest told us: “inspiration comes not from a Google search but from real people’s life stories, like here at Ideas Tapas.

    Stay curious....


    [if you’d like to sign up to be updated on Ideas Tapas - here’s the link]

  • In Union Square with a table and two chairs

    When I tweeted I was on my way to New York last week, a guy who follows me on Twitter got in touch and said he’d like to meet up. His name is Matthew Stillman. I didn’t know him or anything about him. But I’ve seen serendipity in action before, I know the value that random connections can bring, I have faith in people and making good connections. What’s more, I thrive on curiosity - this is ‘my year of living curiously’ - so of course, I had to meet him.

    A former TV producer with The Food Network, Matthew is a veteran of improvisational comedy who’s produced a documentary “The End of Poverty?”. He also has a fascinating story to tell about what he’s been doing in New York’s Union Square for the last few years, with a table, two chairs and a sign ‘Creative Approaches to What You’ve Been Thinking About’.Here’s a chat we had after our coffee: